DVD secret site

Discussions of various topics about Paul not covered in the forums below.

Moderator: Mike

Postby Steve-o » Fri Dec 27, 2002 1:09 am

Yeah---I'll check around a bit more, as I've only gone to Dell so far. I may be getting a new one in 6 months or so, and now that option is standard with the package we have been getting. Would be great to watch movies in the hotel room for free!!
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Postby Aujouret » Fri Dec 27, 2002 4:56 am

This is all very interesting, Mike. It sounds easy enough.
But I have a very dumb question: What is grounding myself?
Can I just wear latex gloves and be cool and not get electrocuted?
(A fried Aujouret is scary[xx(])
Couldn't I just unplug everything? I mean I would need to disconnect the PCU anyway.
I could probably find one cheap as you say, Mike.
Thanks for your help.
Then we can look forward to all the cool Macca stuff coming in the future.
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Postby Steve-o » Fri Dec 27, 2002 8:58 am

quote:Originally posted by Aujouret
What is grounding myself?
2 meanings, really:

A) To tell oneself that said person can't go out of the house unless it's for school or work, for a period of time, for something that they did that was B-A-D.

B) To get a grip on reality--look at things in a more realistic fashion. To have both feet planted firmly on the ground.

I think Mike was talking about something electrical maybe, lol.
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Postby Ram1 » Fri Dec 27, 2002 9:37 am

HAHA..

Yes, I think Mike was talking about protecting your personal safety. LOL. Speaking of electrical shock and frying oneself, I love the part in Dead Man Walking when Sean Penn (forget the character's name at the moment) is heading for the electric chair, and the guard goes, "Dead man walkin'!" Doesn't sound funny unless you've seen it, but it kinda is. He looks and sounds like Wilford Brimley.
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Postby Mike » Fri Dec 27, 2002 10:09 am

No, with the computer unplugged from the wall outlet, there is no risk of yourself getting electricuted from a computer. However us humans carry static electricity, for example remember rubbing a balloon on your shirt and it sticks to a wall, or rubbing your feet on a carpet (in winter when it's dry) then touching someone and you give them a little shock? This is what I'm speaking of. If you have a little tiny buildup of a static charge in your body and you touch say a memory chip, zap, forget about your computer ever working again. Depending on what component you touch the discharge takes the closest route to ground and would damage anything succeptible. If you had a static charge in you and say when to wipe off some dust on the hard drive and touched a chip, that could erase or damgae your hard drive making it useless. It's unpredictable really.

Now when I spoke of grounding yourself, I simply mean touching something metal that is grounded. Touch the metal frame of the computer while its still plugged in. There is a ground wire that is connected to the metal frame that goes to the wall outlet and if the outlet is proper it should have an electrical ground, you know that 3rd middle leg on a plug. A radiator, desk something that would discharge any static charge built up in you.

Here is a better description:

Static Electricity and Computers
Whenever the casing of a computer is opened and its internal workings are exposed (to change a hard drive or add memory chips, for example), there is a danger of damaging the computer with the buildup of static electricity that is held by the human body. The internal workings of a computer, and especially the hard drive, are extremely susceptible to static electricity, which can cause considerable damage to the hard drive if it is zapped with even a small amount. Microchip damage can occur if it is exposed to static electricity as low as 500 volts, and humans are not able to perceive static electricity until it has reached about 1,500 volts. (Walking across a rug can produce a static electricity voltage of up to 12,000 volts, but static voltage is not life threatening.) So it is possible to damage a hard drive with static electricity that is not even felt by the person because it is at such a low voltage.
Static electricity is caused by a process called triboelectrification. Everything around us, and including us, is made of atoms, and every atom has in its center (nucleus) positively charged protons and neutrons, which have no electrical charge. Surrounding the atom are negatively charged electrons. The protons and neutrons in an atom do not change, but the electrons can move from one atom to another. When two objects touch, they exchange electrons, which causes one object to become electrically positive and the other to become electrically negative. When an object touches another object with either an opposite or neutral charge, electrons flow. Static electricity is created when electrons move back and forth between atoms.

To avoid zapping your components with static electricity, take precautions to ground the static electricity before touching any of the internal components of the computer. Wearing an ESD wrist strap will prevent any static electricity from damaging your computer. Another way to ground the static electricity is to touch the internal metal frame of the computer's case while the computer is plugged into an electrical socket. The static electricity will be discharged and grounded as the electrical circuit is grounded via the AC outlet. And to be on the safe side, always handle the electronic circuitry on the motherboard, video card, modem, sound card, hard drive and other internal components by any insulated, non-circuitry areas if they have them to insure that you do not send a bolt of static electricity coursing through it.
http://www.webopedia.com/DidYouKnow/Com ... static.asp

Here is a links describing Static Electriciy in more detail: http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/static.html , http://www.electrostatics.com/page2.html
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Postby Mike » Fri Dec 27, 2002 10:15 am

Here is a link to much more detailed instructions, especially if your going to keep your original CD rom installed.

http://www.digital-digest.com/dvd/artic ... uide6.html

Here is a link with a tutorial video on How to install a DVD ROM,
http://howto.lycos.com/lycos/topic/0,,34538,00.html
The DVD probably wouldn't be coming with an interface card as the video describes, this is an older version/video as it says the DVD rom costs $200-600.
Isn't google.com great, all I did was type "install DVD ROM" and all these links come up. Now they have a new search engine called FROOGLE.com and if you type DVD ROM it will come up with all the online places to buy a DVD ROM and have price comparisions.
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